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20121030
20121030
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps t work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's w
, the economy, and civil rights. >> also the rights of women especially remain in question. the problem has been highlighted by a recent rate case -- rape case. >> the case has attracted intense scrutiny in tunisia. a young woman has accused two policemen of rape. they are under investigation, and her complaint led to a countercharge. the state prosecutor has accused her of indecent behavior. for many here, the case is a backward step for women's rights in post-revolution tunisia. this case is important for all tunisian women, and things are especially bad for women who are victims of violence. many will be too scared to press charges. this woman provides advice to victims of domestic violence at the office of tunisian association of democratic women. she says more and more women are coming to her since the revolution. women are developing the courage to seek help, but she says many men are abusing their newfound freedoms. >> women tell us what their husbands are saying to them. the men say they can do what they want and as soon they will have the right to have four wives. >> tunisian is changin
in the community in accordance with our civil rights, you know, as what's affirmed under the olmstead decision to support people living in the community. so this legislation that was introduced i think is a very important step towards supporting people here and you can expect to be hearing more about it over the next two months and i would encourage everybody to come to the hearings as the legislation is actually discussed in committee and at the board and to voice your support. another piece of that legislation, too, would mandate the installation of telephone jacks in the units because of course communication sometimes is that life and death link to emergency services. i also wanted to bring to the attention of the council a new committee that will start meeting next week. it's called the accessible parking policy advisory committee. this is sponsored by the municipal transportation authority. the first meeting will be on tuesday, october 23, at 2:00 pm at 1 south van ness. the public is welcome. what the committee plans to do is review existing state and local walls that govern placards
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
of faith understand this isn't about any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> the sewage treatment system that serves the vast majority of homes in howard county is now back in operation, but tens of millions of gallons of raw consumer discharged into the little patuxent river before electricity was restored to the plant. tonight county officials are asking some very pointed questions. fox 5's john henrehan is live at the treatment facility. john, i imagine residents have some questions and concerns, too. >> reporter: tha little heated comments today. here are the headlines. the water system was never in jeopardy in howard county. they're entirely separate systems. the water was always safe to drink. the good news is this sewage treatment facility is back in operation. the bad news is up to 25 million gallons of untreated sewage went into the chesapeake bay watershed before this place came back online. officials in howard county call this com
, but a civil right. i will now turn the program over to our program administrator, ken stein. >> thank you very much, wendy. last month we had a program, swords to plowshares. today we will be hearing from marc trotz and dr. rag parekh. i want to thank dr. parekh, our first presenter who serves on the front lines of the most difficult to serve clients in the hardest economic times on a daily basis which, it me, is an incredible -- it's astounding what you and ran parker and your team do is remarkable. i also really want to thank marc trotz for coming today. some of you know he's going to be leaving the city at the end of the month and with his travel schedule this month and the fact he's leaving in a few weeks, the fact he took time to come and be with us today is great. i think it speaks super for transition that margo antonetti, is here today, we're delighted he's going to be here. a couple years ago i had the great, great pleasure of taking a tour of one of the city's supportive programs led by marc and it was an hour and a half tour. we don't have that much time today but i was most
as a criminal prosecutor, a civil rights attorney, founder of a small business, and volunteered as chair of both the neighborhood association and an affordable housing organization. when i was elected four years ago, i promised to bring people together to deliver results, to increase cooperation and accountability at city hall. over the past four years, i'm proud of what we have=hvj÷ accomplishedpj9n together, focug on what matters, to deliver for our dim0]czdñ 3 neighborhoods, again and again. now, we've been creating jobsm with waterfront projects to open the new exploratorium, cruise ship terminal, america's campus, a chinese hospital. we're been keeping families in our city by rebuilding the recreation center, playgrounds all over the district, we've been supporting small businesses, cutting small business fees, red tape, and championing business tax reform on the november ballot. when proposition e passes so that we end our tax on jobs rather than on profits, our local merchants, our restaurants, cafes and shops will be able to hire more people. we've been building affordable housing for
in their business department. i was very active in the civil rights movement in new orleans. i moved to san francisco in 1980 with my wife cheryl and our son scott because i bought a seat on the pacific stock exchange in order to trade options for my own account. i did that successfully until 1980 at which time i became an arbitrator for finish ra, the financial industry regulatory authority. i'm still an arbitrator for finra. i also taught as an adjunct professor at usf. i taught real estate in their finance department. when i stopped trading i became more deeply involved in that district. i was elected to the st. stevens school board and was also appointed to the board of directors at the stones town ymca. i coached youth sports at the y and i also fund raised for both organizations. later fund raised for sacred heart where my son went to school and st. ignatius where my daughter went to school. my son is in the police department and my daughter works in the tech industry. my wife and i are very proud of both of them. i served on my homeowners association as delegate to the western twin p
. veronica from the civil rights commission who is here today can answer any technical questions, worked closely with general manager carl kelly. and the advisory committee to develop these changes. and, so, we hope that you will endorse them and again, veronica is here to answer any additional questions you might have. >> i would like some public comment. lisa [speaker not understood]. >> i'm glad you guys can see me. good morning, commissioners. my name is lisa [speaker not understood]. i am the chair for the sfpuc small permit advisory committee. and i'd like to thank you today for this opportunity to be able to speak to you. anyways, we are in favor of endorsing these changes and we hope that you would also see fit to do the same thing. you guys have done a great job in creating opportunities for contractors out there, the larger and the smaller contractors. myself, i'm going to kind of wear two hats here. i'm also a field representative with the carpenters union, carpenters local 152 in manteca in which i cover seven counties. and through this we've had opportunities for our members
legislature. and i saw the beginnings of the current law. there are civil rights laws. there is nothing wrong with that, except that the idea was you just get them back on the streets and they're all going to get well. you get them out of the state hospitals, they're all going to get well. well, first of all, they can't handle their medication. they can't handle treatment. they have to be put in a ward or they have to be put under laura's law where their medication is supervised. if you're going to give them a chance to live. and the people who aren't treated are the people who self-medicate and they have a major portion of the street drug clients. they're the people who self-medicate on alcohol. and when i was putting together two major programs in berkeley which were teleconferencing [speaker not understood] berkeley and ucsf on mental health and public policy and mental health and law, and you can look at those programs by going to mental health law symposium, all of them together on the web and see what those people said. and the last putting together, willie brown, and i know willie brow
, not disclosing that information when they get to the polls. >> joe, poll watching is done by all party, civil rights groups you and i have been affiliated with. there's nothing wrong with it. why would someone want to purposely deceive their connection or affiliation with poll watching unless there's something they're going to do -- we're dealing with here that does not meet the eye? >> they might get one of those samuel l. jackson attitudes, you know, get out of my face mentality. first of all, that's understand what this is -- who they're directing this at. they will -- it will slow down, for example, the process. now, if you slow down the process -- look how long the lines are been for voting early. imagine what the lines will look like on election day. you slow down the process by having all of these challenges. number two, the elderly are targeted because they lie and they say that a poll worker can't come out and help an elderly who might be in a car or van who has a wheelchair. that's a lie. it slows down those who think they might be discouraged, because i have a record even though i'
any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> here's your seven-day forecast. rain continues this afternoon. it will become lighter as the day wears on as will the winds which were still gusty this morning. and then later this afternoon winds 20 to 30. hang in there. halloween looks a little brighter, temperatures in the mid-50s and some sunshine to end the week, so we'll get a chance to dry out and clean up over much of the seven days as it looks nice and quiet. >> lauren demarco called in from ocean city to let us know 17th down to inlet, is that what's closed, katie? yeah. that's still closed, but 62nd to 17th is now reopened. so you can go back and check out your businesses and the like. >> ocean city. >> that's in ocean city, >> that's some good news.
america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember justngu know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know, that's between your ears ultimately. art is abo
. thousands of attorneys representing two major presidential candidates civil rights groups are in place policied to challenge electoral results that may be called in question by machine failures, voter suppression or other allegation of illegal activity. that is a story also in "u.s.a. today" taking a look at what happened in 2000 in florida and saying that possibly another state could be like florida in battleaybe ohio or other ground states where you could have a recount and not know who the winner of the election is. also front page of the "wall street journal" medicare complicates the senior vote. senior citizens are a coveted bloc in florida where three make bum a quarter of the electr elee and they are important to romney given the deficit among young voters and minorities. he needs not only to win among seniors but win big. in 2008 john phmccain captured e group by 8% margin but lost to president barack obama. mr. romney is leading among the elderly by 6% to 12% a sign he may be weathering a charge by democrats that he and ryan with undermine medicare. that is the "wall street jo
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
, departments, and to the public. the city email conversion project. i know that the civil grand jury points that as a failure or a ongoing frustration. i think we see some of the recent success and progress we're optimistic. right now 3600 users, 27 departments and some of the largest departments are slated for conversion in the next months and library is slated for conversion and additional 1300 accounts and others in january. our largest department with another 7100 accounts. data center consolidation and virtualization has been so successful that the scope has been expanded. initially the project was to convert or relocate 900 servers and 750 have been virtualized and 400 identified as candidates and 300 additional for relocation and total of 1400 servers, much larger than the originally scope of the project. this is also a sign of collaboration among the departments and one of the data center is housed at the airport and not in our department of technology. enterprise agreements have recently been completed with bm ware and adobe and projected to save the city money over the next
but i do believe everyone is entitled to rights and that's why i support civil unions. >> moderator: next question to the kingman. >> this keep in via e-mail. how would you restructure the taxes? >> i talked about the need to make our code more simple and fair. we have way to many loopholes taken advantage of because it's school in they have lawyers that find these loopholes. that doesn't mean it's right. even if it's legal, we should change that because it's not helping create jobs. every day i meet with small business owners, and those guys, a lot of them just -- they come fresh from their work. they have oil on them and grease, and they can't afford to hire a whole wing of lawyers to find these loopholes? that's an example. and by the way, jets and oil companies and loopholes that allow companies to write off moving jobs overseas, those are primed to be closed. that helps our small businesses. we can lower rates for our guys and gals and hard-working families. so what i'm for is making sure we execute this process. i have voted to stepped -- extend out the current rates for a yea
wrote, it's not "the new york times"' job to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. and that got me thinking, well, then whose job is it? you know, if it's not going to be the times, and if you're going to shut out private plaintiffs from pursuing this information, i don't know, you know, that leaves a sort of a vacuum. and i would have thought that responsible government would believe that the vacuum should be filled by the government, right? as opposed to by law professors and, you know, senators or national security. i do, as i said in the beginning, i do agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different, um, insofar as the tensions, um, from what it's been really for the better part of the post-world war -- the better part of the last 70 years. but i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability than at least i'm comfortable with, um, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, law professor who hasn't spent time in the trenches like these guys. >> you know, i think it's a little uncomfortable to
of reality, i think african-americans and most people in modern civilization have a long ways to go before they perceive reality in the right way that will permit them to have the kind of brotherhood that we all hope for in these great religions of christianity, judaism, islam, etc. before we can have that real brotherhood, that feeling of love for my fellow human being, i think we have to grow up and mature a lot when it comes to perceiving the realities that we think we know already, you know. i'm talking about our nation. the way i perceive our nation, i think, is very healthy for me, and i wish all african-americans could perceive this america the way i perceive it, but they don't. and the many white americans that i have become acquainted with perceive this nation as not the way that i think would give me a good life and my children a good life if i passed those feelings on to my children. so american people, in my opinion- and not only the way we perceive america, the way we look at human beings, too, human life and everything, i think we are a society of people that are far advanced
a criminal law and civil law background. he was confident. he had the right work ethic. everything about it was a perfect fit for us. remember, if you have a civil law firm with a contingency fee incentive in a case like that involving a state, you miss issues that are important to the state of alabama. one issue in the bp case, which is critical to state, is that the judge's decision to apply federal maritime law to the penalties that would apply if they recovered as opposed to state penalties. alabama has significant state penalties for these events. the judge decided to go with the federal statute. that's on appeal in the 5th circuit because we feel like in criminal law terms if they manufacture poisen in atlanta, sends it to birmingham to poisen someone, the state has jurisdiction over that. that's a simple analogy, but that's the state criminal law state authority power issue that's at stake in this litigation, and an in-house lawyer who understands that is particularly important in cases like that. the other thing that doug mentioned, and the question was where do you get your info
to tolerate it and sort of equated it to the first amendment. that is never going to be my approach to civil liberties or equality. i am proud that we overturned don't ask, don't tell. and yes, marriage and equality is the right thing to do. >> rep wilson? >> the alpha lincolnville that you have sponsored, federal funding from schools, if there is believed in the schools, bullying for any reason is an unacceptable. i think that is best dealt with by teachers and parents and authorities, not by cutting funds from a school if there is bullying going on in the school. that is the position i take. like you, i am a parent. we do not need washington to solve those problems for us. >> rep? >> actually, when congress when wilson was in congress, she helped pass the no child left behind legislation, and it did just that. it took away power from our schools and put it into a one size fits all structure that does not teach new mexico kids. i would repeal the legislation. >> i'm going to do something a little different here, and give each of you a chance for one more were bottle on this issue, starting
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)